The Kabul Times.
Editorial

Terrorism should be dealt seriously

The war on terror was launched in Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attack on World Trade Center in New York City. US forces took a military action as a backlash against the Taliban and their Al-Qaeda allies. The operation was very serious that the Taliban could hardly find sanctuaries inside the country. The Tora Bora, which was allegedly used as Taliban’s sanctuary, was under heavy bombardments. Ultimately, the Taliban regime was overthrown.
It was only the start of the long story. The Taliban reactionaries resurfaced with radically religious beliefs to launch jihad against the foreign troops in Afghanistan. They regrouped as an insurgency and fighting against Afghan government and inflicted heavy casualties on Afghan civilians too.
Despite of foreign troops presence, thousands of Afghan combatants and non-combatants were martyred and injured by the terrorist groups, including Taliban. Although many national, region and international conferences were held to draw attention to Afghanistan war and ease peace process, but Taliban are not ready to declare truce, and have been intensifying their militancy across the country.
After foreign troops withdrawal, the military and intelligence agencies of United States are racing to refine plans for countering extremist groups in Afghanistan following President Biden’s planned troop withdrawal, but current and former US officials warn it will be far more difficult to head off threats to U.S. security from afar.
Biden said the United States would reposition personnel and equipment once the Pentagon pulls its forces out of Afghanistan ahead of the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. “We’ll not take our eye off the terrorist threat,” Biden said as he announced his decision, to end a war that is now America’s longest, a goal that has eluded earlier presidents.
Top Biden officials said the move, which came despite warnings from military and intelligence leaders that withdrawal could permit a diminished al-Qaeda to regroup, was necessary to comply with a 2020 withdrawal agreement President Donald Trump negotiated with the Taliban, and to allow the United States to focus on more pressing challenges.
The hope of Afghan people, who were imaging Afghanistan as utopian country after the fall of Taliban’s regime, crumbled. They are largely falling victim to terrorist acts and the country rather changed to a dystopian place. The ugly face of horror and terror exhausted Afghans to a large extent. The war on terror did not seem serious and aroused people’s mistrust.
Afghans forces have been in front line of war on terror since 2014 and have made significant achievements in tackling Daesh and Al-Qaeda remains in the country. But the Afghans efforts needed to be supported by the international community, since there are still foreign fighters fighting alongside Taliban against Afghan government and people.
As a matter of fact, the war that was started in Afghanistan on the pretext of war against terrorism has not been able to eradicate terrorism and billions of dollars that have been spent on Afghanistan have not been able to guarantee a safe and stable country.
Given the regional and international negligence against terrorism, there is no optimism and hopes to fundamentally get rid of terrorism. Because most of the terrorist groups either used as a political against others or they are reactionary movements need to recognize their legitimate demands.
Therefore, terrorism would not be ended as long as we do not accept justice, equality, dignity, freedom and prosperity for all as well as extend truly cooperation hand with each other. US should do more to keep eye on Taliban links with terror outfits as terrorism is destructive phenomena not justifiable and not acceptable anyhow. Otherwise, we should expect for unexpected breed of terrorists who are interested in mass death and destruction at any time, anyone and anywhere.

Related posts

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

The Kabul Times.