The Kabul Times.
Editorial

Afghans’ misery seems unending

Considering Afghanistan’s history, there has never been a peaceful transition of power. The power transition has always been the bloody coups and takeovers, or family rifts that had been the dominant factor in deciding who should rule the country. The Saur revolution that took place in 1978, in which the then government of Dawood Khan was toppled following a military coup led by the Peoples’ Democratic Party of Afghanistan, was the bloodiest and put the country in chaos.

The revolution, which was not just a takeover and regime change, but a day that started an ideological battle and brought the cold war in Afghanistan, followed by the collapse of the then Soviet Union and Afghanistan went deep into a bloody war that took four decades and the war and bloodshed still taking lives from the innocent Afghans.

The 1978 revolution opened a new chapter of violent politics that led the bloodshed for decades. The takeover of the government led by the then communist party not only brought a bit of peace to the country, but further fueled war and paved the way for invasion of the country by the then USSR troops. Their invasion forced Afghans to unite against the occupation and war and bloodshed took each and every corner of the country.

Meanwhile, 8th Saur is celebrated as the victory day for Mujahideen when they overthrew the Soviet remnants in 1992. But that victory, unfortunately, was another transition into dark era of the civil war among Mujahideen factions that cost lives of thousands and made Afghans the largest refugee Diaspora in the world.

Then it took all the glories of resistance against the Soviet Union into a shameful myth due to the bloodbath of civil war in 90s that took lives of thousands, followed by the darkest period of our history with emergence of Taliban when the country was taken to the verge of disintegration with a polarized fascistic ideological war.

Now that US and NATO forces are withdrawing form the country after almost 20 years, the country and the citizens are yet to see a bit of peace and stability. Despite of experiencing many regimes, imposed wars and bloodsheds that martyred millions of people and forced millions of others to migrate to other countries, Afghans are yet to live in a peaceful atmosphere.

Considering the four decades of war in the country, unity and mutual understanding among Afghan people are indeed key to prosperity of the country. Lack of unity and commitment among Afghan leaders in the past, caused misery and bloodshed which Afghans are still witnessing its consequences.

Meanwhile disunity among different factions and continued foreign interferences in the past indulged in civil war with emergence of Taliban. The lesson of that bloody chapter of history for today is that no ideology or power-seeking group can cling to power by force, and a smooth transfer of power in a free, fair and transparent election is the only way forward.

Afghans have come a long way and have given much sacrifices in war on terror, therefore the achievements should be undermined post foreign troops withdrawal. Learning from the past, Taliban should agree for a lasting ceasefire and negotiate with Afghan government to find solution for the ongoing war. Attacking major cities and carry suicide attack on public places would bear no result for them but would increase people’s haters and the group would be further isolated.

All efforts should be made to avoid the country once again move towards devastating war, rather the warring factions join hands to provide a safe and sound environment for Afghans and pave the way for development of the war-torn country.

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The Kabul Times.